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mitch mcconnell was the number one obstructionist in the president's first term. now he tells "the wall street journal" he'll do whatever it takes to get a deal. i'd be willing to pay the ransom if e we thought we were going to get the hostage out. but the hostage is what? entitlement spending. mcconnell's intention, he's willing to agree to a dollar of new taxes for every dollar in cuts. what a difference an election makes. >> i'm going to ask a question on the stage. they seau had a real spending cuts deal, 10 to 1. spending cuts to tax increases. spooker, you're already shaking your head. but who on this stage would walk away from that deal? would you raise your hand about not raising taxes. >> remember in 2011 republicans would not take a 10 to 1 tax cut deal? now today mitch mcconnell is willing to do a 1 to 1 deal. republicans lost all of their leverage in this election. they made a big gamble and came up empty handed. in 2011 president obama was cutting deals with john boehner on the golf course. it was very favorable for the republicans. the president agreed to more than $1.2 tr
to avoid the nasty showdowns that mark so much of the last two years. senate republican leader mitch mcconnell was the number one obstructionist in the president's first term. now he tells "the wall street journal" he'll do whatever it takes to get a deal. i'd be willing to pay the ransom if e we thought we were going to get the hostage out. but the hostage is what? entitlement spending. mcconnell's intention, he's willing to agree to a dollar of new taxes for every dollar in cuts. what a difference an election makes. >> i'm going to ask a question on the stage. they seau had a real spending cuts deal, 10 to 1. spending cuts to tax increases. speaker, you're already shaking your head. but who on this stage would walk away from that deal? would you raise your hand about not raising taxes. you'd walk away on the 10-1 deal? [ applause ] >> all right. just to bring everybody up to speed, remember in 2011, republicans would not take a 10 to 1 tax cut deal. now today mitch mcconnell is willing to do a 1 to 1 deal. republicans lost all of their leverage in this election. they made a big gamble and ca
that mark so much of the last two years. senate republican leader mitch mcconnell was the number one obstructionist in the president's first term. now he tells "the wall street journal" he'll do whatever it takes to get a deal. i'd be willing to pay the ransom if e we thought we were going to get the hostage out. but the hostage is what? entitlement spending. mcconnell's intention, he's willing to agree to a dollar of new taxes for every dollar in cuts. what a difference an election makes. >> i'm going to ask a question on the stage. they seau had a real spending cuts deal, 10 to 1. spending cuts to tax increases. speaker, you're already shaking your head. but who on this stage would walk away from that deal? would you raise your hand about not raising taxes. you'd walk away on the 10-1 deal? [ applause ] >> all right. just to bring everybody up to speed, remember in 2011, republicans would not take a 10 to 1 tax cut deal. now today mitch mcconnell is willing to do a 1 to 1 deal. republicans lost all of their leverage in this election. they made a big gamble and came up empty handed.
years. senate republican leader mitch mcconnell was the number one obstructionist in the president's first term. now he tells "the wall street journal" he'll do whatever it takes to get a deal. i'd be willing to pay the ransom if e we thought we were going to get the hostage out. but the hostage is what? entitlement spending. mcconnell's intention, he's willing to agree to a dollar of new taxes for every dollar in cuts. what a difference an election makes. >> i'm going to ask a question on the stage. they seau had a real spending cuts deal, 10 to 1. spending cuts to tax inkrecreas. spooker, you're already shaking your head. but who on this stage would walk away from that deal? would you raise your hand about not raising taxes. >> remember in 2011 republicans would not take a 10 to 1 tax cut deal? now today mitch mcconnell is willing to do a 1 to 1 deal. republicans lost all of their leverage in this election. they made a big gamble and came up empty handed. in 2011 president obama was cutting deals with john boehner on the golf course. it was very favorable for the republicans. the
done, much more so than mitch mcconnell, if he can get a deal done in the first six months, he's got health reform and putting the nation's fiscal house in order for the next three, four, five generations as the signature achievement already of his second term, that puts you in the league of some of the most successful presidents in our history. those are huge, big-time -- those are big-time accomplishments. >> he's got the opportunity. >> yes, that's what i'm saying. the door is open for him. >> he is going to have to strike some deals. >> he is. >> and he's going to have to make some grand alliances. >> i don't know anyone who knows speaker boehner who doesn't say a couple of things about him. one, pretty good guy. >> handsome. handsome. >> two, can cut a deal. knows how to cut a deal. and three, from that clip, joe, a guy who knows that he is one of the point people in leading a renewal of the republican party. he's got to cut a deal. he's got to cut a deal. >> but he doesn't have to cut a deal. that's the point and that's what the president and that's what the white house needs t
? the signs aren't clear. mitch mcconnell seemed to be saying no on tuesday, john boehner seemed to be saying possibly. so the issue is are they willing to move to the center on key issues? >> the books are being written but the chapters have yet to be lived out in a second obama term. ron suskin wrote in an op-ed for "the new york times" about whether obama can give the confidence americans need right now, focusing on legacy, which he goes on to say is the end game of the president and is often missing what's happened before his eyes. the great mishap of the first term is failing to direct. with a new president, a sky high approval rating, a sea of enthusiasts. with hindsight 2020, how will obama be different with legacy now in front of his mind? >> i actually think, in terms of legacy, he's going to have the legacy of bringing health care reform, which presidents have tried for a very long time, to fruition here in america, and he made a choice in doing that, and it probably was a choice that cost him some political capital because it came at the expense of some other things he might have d
, the other thing to watch out for is the fact senator mcconnell, normally a kaubs, very cautious politician by nature will look over his shoulder to make sure he doesn't face a tea party challenge. all of that together, i think, makes it a toxic atmosphere and something we will have to all watch carefully. >> now you -- do you believe that the president is giving up leverage if the republicans don't believe he'll go over the cliff? >> yes. >> and you think he has sent a message that he's willing to go over the cliff? >> i think he sent the message and i'm prepared to reiterate that. >> you think the president is willing to go over the cliff? >> i believe that he is prepared -- >> i have not heard that from him. >> you are looking at the fact that come january 1st if there's no agreement taxes will go up on everyone. including the middle class. i think that's a politically unsustainable position. that the republicans are going to come to regret but, yes, you're right. you haven't heard it yet from the president. he needs to keep his flexibility open as we go into these negotiations but i thi
to senator mitch mcconnell whose instant reaction to the president being re-elected was this is not a mandate, how do the republicans find the compromise? i believe it was the headline on politico well before we got into the heart of the campaign season that said speaker boehner's job was specially trying to hurt cats referring to some members of his caucus. >> that's a good analogy. the president came very short of saying, i won, you didn't. he said, you know, look i want to compromise. everything's on the table. i want to hear your ideas. but the people have spoken and we need to get moving here. speaker boehner is from the old school of let's get something done. he has been hijacked and hamstrung by the right flank of his party, and i think what he was trying to say the day after the election is you know okay. i'm with you. let's try to get this done. i'm ready to jettison some of the loons, the far right in the party, and try to work with democrats to get a compromise. the other thing is they're both using squishy language. they're talki
mitch mcconnell and some of the more adult members of the republicans in the senate can put pressure on the house. if they can't change those fundamental dynamics, we're heading in the same direction. >> i think mitch mcconnell is a problem because he's up for re-election and he's worried about getting a challenge from the tea party right. mr. boehner said this is your moment, mr. president, now lead. that's an acknowledgment of reality and a bit of a trying to pass the buck, but it's the truth. it is going to be up to the president to go into those negotiations and to lead and to continue to listen and find areas where compromise can be built. >> but he has to lead -- >> let me help you out. >> he has to lead publicly as well because the election -- >> sell. >> he has to sell it. there aren't a lot of republicans i think at play from -- in regards to public pressure, but there are a few, and the president is going to have to work hard to find points of pressure on those people -- >> let's try -- >> they have to be willing to absorb some blows. >> remember how he ran against hillary
. >> eric: another quick point. when you have john boehner and mitch mcconnell and mitt romney talking about immigration, immigration reform, it doesn't hold the water, the credibility when marco rubio or ted cruz or martinez does it, who has a better background and basis for making comments on it. that is why it -- >> bob: it's a question of policy. are they going to change policy? >> eric: they are the ones to do it. if you're romney with immigration reform. >> dana: in 1986, they passed the bill, the immigration bill because of the amnesty bill in 1986, republicans are the ones that passed that. ronald reagan signed it. republicans lost seats in 1988. i don't know if that is the right rabbit to chase. >> bob: they increased percentage among hispanics. >> andrea: i still say no, matter what, amnesty, free healthcare, student loans. give, give, give. g.o.p., no quick fix and it doesn't see a harvard professor to see where it's going. coming up, the main stream media may not be totally to blame for the republican losses this week but they weren't fair and balanceed in the reporting. what sho
. and rand paul who is very close to mitch mcconnell who runs the republican party in the senate. he told us he's going to start pushing for more lax marijuana laws, going to start pushing for a pathway to citizenship on illegal immigration. he said that this tea party conservatism that brought him power and some fame needs to recalibrate too and they need to use this libertarian strain to start to reach out to people in cities, in the northeast, they can't be a one-region party. again, it's not just bobby jindal, it's across the board where you have prominent, influential republicans re-thinking what it means to a republican. and that is, i think that is the one silver lining for the republican party from the results last week. >> by the way, jim, that's a big, big silver lining. a big silver lining. this is a party, this wasn't a goldwater type wipeout. it was a couple of percentage points in the popular vote. you have a president whose campaign team was brilliant and they outmaneuvered the republicans tactically in nine states. no doubt, we were out of touch with voters on issues, but it
'll have to do some of that in order to get republicans support on taxes. even mitch mcconnell went to the floor and said, i will consider higher revenues, but the president has to agree to something on entitlements. so the question is, if he does do something, how many democrats can the president bring on board because as you mentioned, the le left, a lot of folks are concerned. people who campaigned for this president don't want him to be throwing him under the bus. >> speaking of the liberal wing of the democratic party, what are you hearing about nancy pelosi's future? >>. she's being mum on that right now. she said tomorrow morning by 10:00 a.m., we'll all know her decision. some of that may leak out beforehand. but right now, she's gauging whether or not she has the political support to keep the control of her spot atop the democratic leadership. she's not saying one way or the other she will stand on board or the democrat from maryland, her number two would assume as the top democratic leader. >> i know the election was a long time ago, but i just wanted to refresh everyone's
world, whether it can get through with mitch mcconnell in the senate and republicans in the house is unclear, but i think the white house will give a big push to that. secondly, remember, as bad as the republican super pacs did, the democratic super pacs, although they didn't spend as much money did quite well. you will see a big focus on who their big donors were. and there were some -- >> okay. that's one other example at work. i'm told by the pros like you, john, that one thing that did succeed in terms of big spending was the attempt -- the success, rather, in defining mitt romney early on by the white house people and their allies. >> absolutely incredible. priorities usa action, they made a bunch of really strategic decisions. they didn't have that much money relative to the larger republican conservative super pacs. they decided to go in hard into certain states, particularly ohio, where they spent the bulk of their money. they ran a bunch of ads that were incredibly -- that got an aincredible amount of attention in terms of they got a lot of air time in terms of what they
of posturing. but it certainly was a much different tone, for instance, than what came out of mitch mcconnell's office office the election, and we've plowed through that plenty. i think what you're going to see now is the white house wants to attack a little bit of time, be thoughtful how public -- what they say publicly versus how much maneuverer ability is there. the other unnamed player is chuck shumer. chuck schumer publicly said i like simpson bowls in the it made an effort but i don't like what they're trying to do with taxes. we can't do this with tax reform. taxes should go up. he wants to move the negotiating position on the democrats in a little bit of a different direction. so what president obama has to navigate is that politics a lit bit in the senate. senate democrats more emboldened. they netted some seats. they didn't just hold their majority. they got a stronger majority. >> right. >> so i think before he goes out too publicly he's got make sure -- the white house has to make sure they're on the same page as harry reid and vice versus, i think that's why there's a little bit
a run against mitch mcconnell. however, she told "us weekly." while i'm honored by the consideration, let's focus oncoming together to keep moving america's families and especially our kids forward. >>> so what happens to a presidential campaign after a loss? the staffers, the campaigners, the candidate? since mitt romney's defeat on tuesday his campaign twitter feed has fallen silent and the credit cards have stopped working pretty much right away. for a look into the end of the romney campaign we turn to garret headache, fresh off the campaign trail after following the former governor's campaign. >> 16 months? >> give or take. >> don't look worse for ware. >> tell us about what it was like wednesday morning, the i guess, you know, they knew going in they were going to have to throw in the towel, what was it like after midnight and how the campaign disbanded? >> sort of like a last person out turn off the lights. you saw staffers coming home after what they expected to be this huge party, getting out of cabs, having their credit cards turned off as you mentioned. people the next day
. if the republicans folded on that then and the mood that we're seeing ut from people like mitch mcconnell and bill crystal their mood on tax has shifted a little bit since the election. i think it's pretty clear at this point where this is going. >> you think their knees are getting weak. i will point out to you, david brooks, writing in the new york times, this is not the republican party of 2010. today's republicans no longer have an incentive to deny obama victories, never running again, much to the point you brought up. republicans will play ball, except then you have people like newt gingrich and this what is newt gingrich said this morning on "morning joe." let's take a listen. >> no house republican should be bamboozled into this idea that the only person that has a mandate is barack obama. the house republicans have a mandate. it's fundamentally different than obama's mandate. they would be well put not to try to cut a deal with obama but to say paul ryan is going to bring forth a solution to the fix, we're going to gather votes for it. i guarantee you you'll have a democratic substitute a
term. what's your response? >> always ask that question except to mitch mcconnell. >> delay younger leadership from the house democratic ranks? >> let's for a moment honor that that's a legitimate question. it's quite offensive. you don't realize it, i guess. the fact is that everything that i have done in my i guess decade now of leadership, is to elect younger and newer people to the congress. >> well, there's a lot going on there, gender, age. let me throw it to you. >> well, there are plenty of land mines there, but basically nancy pelosi has been saying that she has worked very hard on behalf of the party, she raised a lot of money. she has been often the very visible target of republicans. we certainly saw that in 2010. she described having an insatiable need to stay in this political game and to be part of the important work that is yet to be done. there are many who have told me that they were a bit surprised that she chose to stay on. others who have said she told not even some of her close associates on capitol hill what her plans were. but her posture certainly led to a s
are already digging in their heels. speaker boehner, senator minority leader mitch mcconnell, paul ryan. all of them saying they will fight the president on taxes. all of them saying the president doesn't have a mandate. but president obama has something to say about that. >> i have one mandate. i have a mandate to help middle class families and families that are working hard to try to get into the middle class. that's my mandate. >> this is a clear message. it's what americans voted for a week ago. are you sure you want this fight, republicans? democrat from pennsylvania chuck fatah and ezra klein, msnbc policy analyst. he's writing about the fight over taxes today and the piece is called "the big question: how, not whether, to raise taxes." thank you for joining me tonight. >> thank you. >> good to be here. >> congressman, do you think republicans will make a deal or is this 2010 with the tea party all over again? >> well, what the public needs to understand is the income tax system is not fair to them. there is a report done by the congress each year by the joint committee on taxation. sh
assess what's going to happen with republicans like speaker john boehner and mitch mcconnell? how does the president persuade them to lay down their pledges to grover norquist and commit to the nation? >> well, ultimately the president is not going to persuade them. ultimately the voters have to persuade them. i think john boehner and a few others in the republican party have got to tell eric cantor and paul ryan and michele bachmann and a lot of the tea partiers in that party, if you continue to insist that taxes are not going to be increased on the rich, we are not going to ever gain or regain control of the senate. we're going to lose control of the house in 2014, 2016. we're going to become a permanent minority party because it makes no sense to most americans. >> hit them where it hurts. professor robert reich, thank you. >>> next, how far will the president go in the showdown against john mccain. >>> but first, hampton pearson has the cnbc market wrap. good afternoon. >> good afternoon. we saw stocks move lower again on more wall street fears of going over the fiscal cliff. the d
, a very different tune than mitch mcconnell four years ago, pledging his only responsibility, job number one, was to see this was a one-term president. so that's some groundwork for the president also, where he's got a playing field that will be much more easier for him to reach out. again, i think he initially saw this campaign as a referendum on the way that republicans governed. if you look at those exit polls, it does show that there is support for the way the president wants to reform the tax code, raising taxes on the middle class, having those bush tax cuts expire. so there is some momentum that he has. it's not a clear, clear mandate because the popular vote, i think, was so close, but on that electoral map, it was a real walloping for republicans and the way that they have governed and the way they have gone about approaching very important issues. this is a big, big time. i agree with carl. this was a referendum on progressive ideas. i think it's a real victory for progressives. you see 20 women going into the senate, all of those issues around abortion are very, very played ve
themselves. frankly, i don't know if the republicans themselves, if john boehner and mitch mcconnell, know how much wiggle roop they have at this point. they're still serving their caucuses and trying to figure out where everybody is. that more than anything is going to determine what kind of deal gets made. the democrats are presenting a very united front. they seem very confident. people on the left are very encouraged by the strong statement that the president made on friday. >> you also wrote here in your most recent column that at least at this point it looks like we know which president obama is going to show up for these negotiations. it is not going to be the compromiser in chief. >> right, the sort of tremendously weak negotiator he proved to be on the debt ceiling a year ago is the one democrats were fearful was going to show up again. at least so far you had him pointing to his leverage on friday. that's encouraging for democrats. >> amy, what are the chances that the speaker is going to be able to get some of his folks to fall in line? >> well, it's going to be a very tough tas
to note. one serious, one not-so-serious. here at cnbc in the business world we're parsing mitch mcconnell and john boehner like you guys are to see what realistic possibility there is to get some sort of deal, whether it will be in the lame duck or will continue to kick the can down the road. that's the discussion. and also i don't know what your habits are for thanksgiving. generally speaking, black friday is when people go shopping, crazy people get in line and that's when the companies turn into the black for the year. walmart is setting 8:00 p.m. as the start of their sales on thanksgiving day! >> oh, my goodness. >> that is when my kids are in bed and i sneak back into the fridge for number three helping. >> wow. 78:00 p.m. the previous day. >> brutal. >> that's awful! >> that's family time. >> hey, brian, thanks so much. we appreciate it. we'll be right back. humans -- even when we cross our t's and dot our i's, we still run into problems. namely, other humans. which is why, at liberty mutual insurance, auto policies come with new car replacement and accident forgiveness if you qual
, the number two senate republican under mitch mcconnell, saying the republican party has a brand problem and a tactical problem. and the republican national chairman, reince priebus, saying in a presentation to senate republicans yesterday that the republican party needs to do a deep dive on what did wrong. they need to look at more of a 50-state strategy like democrats had. they are going to do focus groups on the republican message. and they're going to talk to state chairmen, donors, outside groups to figure out how they can make their message more rez nant and their machine more effective. >> as mike is explaining here, the reaction to what romney said is almost more interesting than what he said. bobby jindal went on to say two points. one, we have to stop dividing the voters. we need to go after 100% of the voters and show how our policies help every voter to achieve the american dream, not just a part of the country. is this a strategic moment for the republican party, turning away from the romney years and looking ahead to '16 and understanding the reason they lost last tuesday?
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 52 (some duplicates have been removed)